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wsly-cn:

Hello everyone, Long time no see.
These days I’m working on something else ( for life, you know :p) .

Today I was been told that my friend-@cainonly's  fan book  [ Heart tree ] has been sold out, that means I can post the fan arts of the book here which were draw last year . 


But honestly, they are not as good as I hoped,  
so……don’t too disappointed to me……………

a-cumberbatch-of-cookies:

reapersun:

 for MadLori based on her magnificent fic, Performance in a Leading Role

AGAIN I COULDN’T JUST DO ONE THING SO I got carried away…..

edit: as requested, here is a version with the tumblr cut in the middle

Remember that time reapersun wasn’t amazing?

Yeah, me neither.

rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info
rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info
rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info
rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info
rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info
rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info
rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info
rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info
rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info
rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there
The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)
Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.
That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.
First Barbican Post: The Auditorium
Second Barbican Post: Backstage
Third Barbican Post: The Stage
Zoom Info

rox712:

Fourth Barbican Post: How to get there

The good news is that Barbican has its own tube station. The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, so getting there is not a problem. The bad news is that Barbican is not only the theatre, it’s a whole estate (see second picture). So, if you ask anyone how to get to the Barbican, they will smile at you, and they’ll tell you that all that you see getting out of the tube station is the Barbican. (Yes, that’s exactly what happened to semioticsofdeduction and me)

Here’s what you have to do: across the street is Beech Street, the one that looks like a tunnel. That’s the way you have to go. On the other side of the tunnel you walk up to the next corner. That’s Silk Street. Turn right and now you should see the Bs from the first picture and the glass roofs that frame the Barbican theatre’s fly tower. That’s the entrance. (On the left of it, you’ll find the very nice stage door) Go through the hallway and behind the glass doors you’ll see the counter where you’ll get your tickets and to the left the entrance to the theatre.

That’s it, that was my last post about the theatre. If you can, do yourself a favour and explore the Barbican Centre a little bit. It’s a great space for the arts. It has cinemas, restaurants, a concert hall, two theatres and a library. We were at Digital Revolution, a wonderful exhibition, but it sadly ends September 14th. As always, if you have any questions, ask away.

First Barbican Post: The Auditorium

Second Barbican Post: Backstage

Third Barbican Post: The Stage

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